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Pisco sour is a drink unknown to the majority of us throughout the world but in Latin America you’ll be met with looks of horror if you say that you have never tried it. Today is National Pisco Sour day in Peru so read our 5 points on Pisco to bring you up to speed!

1. Pisco takes it’s name from the area in which it is produced in Chile but the origins of the word itself are from the old native language Quechua. Some say that it means a bird whilst others will insist that it’s the word for the clay pots in which the Quechua stored their local spirit, chicha.

2. Both Chile and Peru claim Pisco as their national drink and there is some rivalry over who actually made it first. This has stepped up in recent years with the Peruvian embassy issuing its ‘Defence of the Peruvian Denomination of Origin Pisco’ and Chile responding with a huge campaign to promote Pisco as a Chilean drink.

3. Pisco dates back to the 16 century when the Spaniards brought the grape to the Peruvian region from Europe, the King of Spain banned wine in the 17th century and not wanting to go thirsty the locals created a different kind of alcohol from the grape – thus Pisco was born.

4. Pisco is now exported to countries all over the world but it’s popularity is still limited, however in Chile and Peru it is drunk as a national pastime and in every bar you’ll find a Pisco Sour in prime place on the menu with several other takes on the recipe as well, the most adventurous being an Aju Sour (with a spicy green chili) and a Sour Haas (with avocados, pineapple and mint)

5. The Peruvians are so proud of ‘their’ national drink that they have devoted a whole day to celebrating it. On the first Saturday of every February, celebrations break out throughout the country and when the Peruvian national anthem is played all Pisco Sours must be finished as a mark of respect. So get drinking!

Here is Dehouche’s winning Pisco Sour recipe: 
• 2 ounces of Pisco Italia, Viñas de Oro
• 1½ ounces of Pisco Quebranta Mosto Verde, Cuatro Gallos
• 1 ounce Peruvian lime juice
• 1 ounce sugar syrup
• ½ ounce egg white

Handshake all of the above in a cocktail mixer for about 60 seconds, fill up the glass and place two drops of Angostura bitters on top.

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